The intention behind the Running Cheetah sculpture

The Running Cheetah sculpture was drawn on my interest in sculpting an animal in a running fluid motion, pushing the idea that I’d started exploring in my leaping spaniel to a more dynamic extreme. I wanted a quality of finish that would appeal to discerning wildlife art collectors, as the running Cheetah sculpture was intended for display in wildlife art galleries.

When I model animals I try where possible to find examples from life, but where I can I also use many photos – often hundreds – showing the animal (and other animals of the breed or species). This helps me sculpt their anatomical features, the way that their hair or fur lies over their muscles, and their different poses and attitudes.

  

The Running Cheetah sculpture by Tanya Russell, ARBS. Limited edition, from the ‘Attitudes’ sculpture range. Handmade in England.

Running Cheetah sculpture in foundry bronze left side view

Material: Foundry Bronze

Limited Edition 12 – Bronze Resin £1,070.
Limited Edition 12 – Foundry Bronze £2,760.

(Prices include VAT and exclude delivery)

Size: L:40cm W:22cm H:23cm

To purchase this Running Cheetah sculpture please contact the artist. As this artwork is handmade colour can vary slightly.

Materials explained

Foundry Bronze is made from molten metal using the lost wax method. Bronze metal is a blend of copper and tin along with other metals to give different characteristics to the final product.

A bronze begins as a clay or wax sculpture, from which a mould is taken. Casting in Foundry Bronze is a costly and time-consuming process, but produces a peerless finish, an incredibly robust sculpture, and a valuable artwork.

 

 

The intention behind the Running Cheetah sculpture

The Running Cheetah sculpture was drawn on my interest in sculpting an animal in a running fluid motion, pushing the idea that I’d started exploring in my leaping spaniel to a more dynamic extreme. I wanted a quality of finish that would appeal to discerning wildlife art collectors, as the running Cheetah sculpture was intended for display in wildlife art galleries.

When I model animals I try where possible to find examples from life, but where I can I also use many photos – often hundreds – showing the animal (and other animals of the breed or species). This helps me sculpt their anatomical features, the way that their hair or fur lies over their muscles, and their different poses and attitudes.